Posts Tagged legislature

Gov. Ivey Hosts Bill Signing Ceremony for MAT Act

Gov. Ivey Hosts Bill Signing Ceremony for MAT Act

Wednesday, Gov. Kay Ivey hosted a formal bill signing ceremony at the Alabama Capitol for this year’s Medication Assisted Treatment Act (“MAT Act”). Flanked by an array of both state and national leaders, the signing of this legislation represents another step Alabama is taking to combat the drug abuse epidemic and help those struggling with addiction.

Passing this bill was no easy feat, however. Introduced just six days before the 2019 Legislative Session ended, the Medical Association worked closely with Sen. Larry Stutts, M.D. in drafting the language for the bill and was instrumental in pushing it to final passage.

“It really is extraordinary what we were able to get done in such a short timeframe,” said Association President, John Meigs, M.D. “I know this was a priority for Senator Stutts, and we were proud to see it become a priority for all legislators. MAT has already been proven to help reduce drug addiction and I am anxious to see its impact in Alabama.”

The Alabama Board of Medical Examiners, with the guidance from a panel of industry stakeholders, is developing rules for medication assisted therapy in Alabama. If you would like to learn more about MAT and the federally-required qualifications for physicians, go to SAMHSA.gov. The Alabama Department of Mental Health also has information about MAT listed here, and a list of current grants for addiction treatment can be found here.

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ALAPAC Launches $75K in 75 Days Campaign

ALAPAC Launches $75K in 75 Days Campaign

Earlier this month, ALAPAC kicked off its year-end fundraising campaign and is seeking to raise $75,000 in 75 days. As the official political action committee of Alabama physicians, ALAPAC provides financial and technical support to candidates medicine can work with on the myriad of health care issues affecting our state.

It may not be a normal election year, but that doesn’t mean there are not elections. In fact, there are two special elections for the Alabama House of Representatives going on right now. What’s more is that in one of these special elections, Charlotte Meadows – the wife of a physician and a former practice manager – is on the ballot and has already made the runoff with 44% of the vote!

Consider this: there are only two physicians in the Alabama Legislature, both of whom serve in the State Senate. This means there are zero physicians in the House of Representatives. Yet, the members of these bodies make decisions directly impacting you, your families, and your patients.

This is why electing quality candidates is so vital. With so many interest groups with objectives that are not in line with increasing access to quality care and maintaining a positive practice environment in Alabama, having elected officials who understand and respect physicians’ needs crucial. A contribution to ALAPAC can help elect this kind of candidate.

When like-minded people pool their resources good things can happen. So get involved! Making a contribution has never been easier. Simply text “ALAPAC” to 91999 or donate here.

 

Disclaimer: Contributions to ALAPAC are not tax-deductible as charitable contributions for Federal income tax purposes. Voluntary political contributions to Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC) are not limited to the suggested amount. The Medical Association will not favor or disadvantage anyone based upon the amount or failure to contribute. A portion of the contributions may be used in connection with Federal elections. Corporate funds will be used in either state elections or for education purposes. Federal contributions are subject to the limitations of FEC Regulations 110.1, .2, and .5.

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Three Simple Steps for Increasing Medicine’s Influence

Three Simple Steps for Increasing Medicine’s Influence

From the outside looking in, the political process likely seems as inviting as a shark tank, as navigable as a corn maze, as predictable as the Kentucky Derby. Intimidating, confusing and frustrating are often used by citizens to describe advocacy-related interactions with government and frankly, this isn’t surprising given most citizens’ level of understanding of the political process.

In his Gettysburg Address, President Abraham Lincoln famously opined our nation’s form of government — “of the people, by the people, for the people” — would long endure. Unlike the direct democracy of 5th century Athens, Americans live in a representative democracy, electing individuals from city councilmen to the President to make decisions for them.

Representative democracy eliminates the need for the citizenry to be involved in the minutiae of modern governance. The downside, however, can be a culture of complacency on the part of the electorate. Outcomes are typically directed by those choosing to engage government on issues important to them, and so government becomes “of the people, by the people, for the people [who choose to participate].” The citizenry is ultimately still responsible for holding government accountable, through either direct engagement with lawmakers or the electoral process (or both), though few understand how to do so.

By following the three simple steps below, physicians can increase their influence on issues important to them and the patients they serve.

Step 1: Join, join, join.

A significant portion of success is simply showing up, but most physicians don’t have the time to spend flying back and forth to Washington or driving to Montgomery for Congressional or legislative meetings, hearings and sessions. Laws and or regulations are constantly under consideration in either the nation’s or state’s capitol directly affecting medical care. A practicing physician can’t possibly make all the scheduled meetings and still see patients, much less attend to the necessary continual monitoring of legislative and regulatory bodies required of successful modern-day advocacy operations.

But when like-minded people pool their resources good things can happen. Advocacy organizations concerned with ensuring delivery of quality care and a positive practice and liability environment — from individual state and national specialty societies to the Medical Association of the State of Alabama — all deserve your support and membership.

They are all working for you and joining them gives these organizations the resources to hire qualified personnel to represent physicians and their patients before legislative and regulatory bodies.

Step 2: Get to know a few key people.

Physicians are responsible for a lot, and in today’s world especially, it’s easy to get into a routine and leave the job of representing the profession to someone else. After all, isn’t that what membership dues are for? Yes and no. While membership in organizations advocating for physicians helps fund advocacy operations, paying membership dues alone is not enough, not in the era of social media, 24-hour news and increased engagement by those on the other side of issues from organized medicine.

Perhaps surprisingly, getting to know a few key people is not difficult, even if only by phone or email. While those paid to represent physicians will know the members of the Legislature and Congress and try to convince them of medicine’s position, in lawmakers’ minds, there is no contact more important than one from a constituent.

Physicians should start locally, getting to know their State Representative and State Senator first, gradually working up to establishing relationships with their member of Congress and U.S. Senators. If they are doing their job well as an elected representative, these legislators and their staff will be glad to hear from a constituent and get his/her perspective. At the same time, don’t overlook the importance of encouraging fellow physicians to engage their local elected officials in meaningful dialogue as well so overall efforts will be amplified.

For more information on how to interact and communicate with lawmakers, check out the Medical Association’s ABCs of VIP.

Step 3: Put your money where your mouth is.

Medical and specialty society membership dollars cannot be legally used for elections purposes, and so separate political action committees or PACs must be established and funds raised each year to help elect candidates physicians can work with on important issues. Not surprisingly, numerous entities whose objectives are at odds with medical liability reform, meaningful health system reform and with ensuring the highest standards for medical care are eager to get their allies elected to office.

Just like their parent organizations, the PACs of specialty societies and the official political committee of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama (ALAPAC) are all worthy of your support. When it comes to PAC contributions, never underestimate the impact of even a small donation.

Choosing not to participate in the political process — when it’s known the decisions of lawmakers directly affect medicine — is akin to getting sued, consciously sitting out voir dire and letting the plaintiff’s lawyer pick the jury.

Summary

The future of medical care, in Alabama and the nation, rests not with elected lawmakers and appointed bureaucrats but with the men and women actually caring for patients every day. A representative democracy functions best when the electorate holds those elected to office accountable. Increasing medicine’s ability to successfully advocate for physicians and the patients they serve will require increased participation in the political process. It is incumbent upon physicians to join the organizations fighting for them, to get to know their elected officials and to contribute to PACs whose goals align with their own.

By Niko Corley
Director, Legislative Affairs
Deputy Director, Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC)

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What If No One Was On Call…2017 Legislative Review

What If No One Was On Call…2017 Legislative Review

In times of illness, injury and emergency, patients depend on their physicians. But what if no one was on call? Public health would be in jeopardy. However, the same holds true during a legislative session. What would happen if the Medical Association was not on call, advocating for you and your patients at the Alabama Legislature? Keep reading to find out.

Moving Medicine Forward

Patients and their physicians want assurances about not only the quality of care provided, but also its continued availability, accessibility, and affordability. Patients want to make health decisions with their doctors, free from third-party interference. Continued progress toward these objectives requires constant vigilance in the legislative arena, where special interest groups seek to undermine physician autonomy, commoditize medicine and place barriers between physicians, their patients and the care their patients need.

If no one was on call… Alabama wouldn’t be the 20th state to enact Direct Primary Care legislation. DPC puts patients and their doctors back in control of patients’ health and helps the uninsured, the under-insured and those with high-deductible health plans. SB 94 was sponsored by Sen. Arthur Orr (R-Decatur) and Rep. Nathaniel Ledbetter (R-Rainsville).

If no one was on call… the Board of Medical Scholarship Awards could have seen its funding slashed but instead, the program retained its funding level of $1.4 million for 2018. The BMSA grants medical school loans to medical students and accepts as payment for the loan that student’s locating to a rural area to practice medicine. The BMSA is a critical tool to recruiting medical students to commit to practice in rural areas. As well, the economic footprint of every physician is at least $1 million, which improves both community health and local economies.

If no one was on call… Medicaid cuts could have been severe, possibly reducing access for patients within an already fragile system in which less than 20 percent of Alabama physicians participate. Due to work done during the 2016 second special session and the 2017 session, sufficient funds were made available for Medicaid without any scheduled cuts to physicians for 2018. Increasing Medicaid reimbursements to Medicare levels – a continued Medical Association priority – could further increase access to care for Medicaid patients.

Beating Back the Lawsuit Industry

Personal injury lawyers are constantly seeking new opportunities to sue doctors. While Alabama’s medical liability laws have fostered fairness in the courtroom and improved the legal climate, each year personal injury attorneys seek to undo parts of the very law that helps keep “jackpot justice” and frivolous suits in check.

If no one was on call… an $80 million tax increase on physicians to fund a new government-administered malpractice claims payout system called the Patients Compensation System could have passed. The PCS would administer damage claims for physical injury and death of patients allegedly sustained at the hands of physicians. Complaints against individual physicians would begin with a call to a state-run 1-800 line and would go before panels composed of trial lawyers, citizens and physicians to determine an outcome. In addition, any determinations of fault would be reported to the National Practitioner Databank. The Patient Compensation System would undo decades of medical tort reforms, which the Medical Association championed and is forced to defend from plaintiff lawyer attacks each session. The PCS deprives both patients and doctors of their legal rights.

If no one was on call… physicians could have been exposed to triple-damage lawsuits for honest Medicaid billing mistakes. The legislation would create new causes of civil action in state court for Medicaid “false claims.” The legislation would incentivize personal injury lawyers to seek out “whistleblowers” in medical clinics, hospitals and the like to pursue civil actions against physicians and others for alleged Medicaid fraud, with damages being tripled the actual loss to Medicaid. The standard in the bill would have allowed even honest billing mistakes to qualify as “Medicaid fraud,” creating new opportunities for lawsuits where honest mistakes could be penalized.

If no one was on call… physicians would have been held liable for the actions or inactions of midwives attending home births. While a lay midwife bill did pass this session establishing a State Board of Midwifery, the bill contains liability protections for physicians and also prohibitions on non-nurse midwives’ scope of practice, the types of pregnancies they may attend, and a requirement for midwives to report outcomes.

If no one was on call… the right to trial by jury, including jury selection and jury size, could have been manipulated in personal injury lawyers’ favor.

If no one was on call… physicians could have been held legally responsible for others’ mistakes, including home caregivers, medical device manufacturers and for individuals following or failing to follow DNR orders.

Protecting Public Health and Access to Quality Care

Every session, various pieces of legislation aimed at improving the health of Alabamians are proposed. At the same time however, many bills are also introduced that endanger public health and safety, like those where the legislature attempts to set standards for medical care, which force physicians and their staffs to adhere to non-medically established criteria, wasting health care dollars, wasting patients’ and physicians’ time and exposing physicians to new liability concerns.

If no one was on call… legislation could have passed to lower biologic pharmaceutical standards in state law below those set by the FDA, withhold critical health information from patients and their doctors, and significantly increase administrative burdens on physicians.

If no one was on call… allergists and other physicians who compound medications within their offices could have been shut down, limiting access to critical care for patients.

If no one was on call… numerous scope of practice expansions that endanger public health could have become law, including removing all physician oversight of clinical nurse specialists; lay midwives seeking allowance of their attending home births without restriction or regulation; podiatrists seeking to amputate, do surgery and administer anesthesia up the distal third of the tibia; and marriage and family therapists seeking to be allowed to diagnose and treat mental disorders as well as removing the prohibition on their prescribing drugs.

If no one was on call… state boards and agencies with no authority over medicine could have been allowed to increase medical practice costs through additional licensing and reporting requirements.

If no one was on call… legislation dictating medical standards and guidelines for treatment of pregnant women, the elderly and terminal patients could have been placed into bills covering various topics.

Other Bills of Interest

Rural physician tax credits… legislation to increase rural physician tax credits and thereby increase access to care for rural Alabamians did not pass but will be reintroduced next session.

Infectious Disease Elimination… legislation to establish infectious disease elimination pilot programs to mitigate the spread of certain diseases failed to garner support on the last legislative day.

Constitutional amendment proclaiming the State of Alabama’s stance on the rights of unborn children… legislation passed to allow Alabamians to vote at the November 2018 General Election whether to add an amendment to the state constitution to:

“Declare and affirm that it is the public policy of this state to recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, most importantly the right to life in all manners and measures appropriate and lawful…”

If ratified by the people in November 2018, this Amendment could have implications for women’s health physicians.

Coverage of autism spectrum disorder therapies… legislation passed to require health plans to cover ASD therapies, with some restrictions.

Portable DNR for minors… legislation establishing a portable DNR for minors to allow minors with terminal diseases to attend school activities failed to garner enough votes to pass on the last legislative day.

If the Medical Association was not on call at the legislature, countless bills expanding doctors’ liability, increasing physician taxes and setting standards of care into law could have passed. At the same time, positive strides in public health — like passage of the direct primary care legislation — would not have occurred. The Medical Association is Alabama physicians’ greatest resource in advocating for the practice of medicine and the patients they serve.

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What If No One Was on Call [at the Legislature]?

What If No One Was on Call [at the Legislature]?

2017 Legislative Recap

In times of illness, injury and emergency, patients depend on their physicians. But what if no one was on call? Public health would be in jeopardy. However, the same holds true during a legislative session. What would happen if the Medical Association was not on call, advocating for you and your patients at the legislature? Keep reading to find out.

Moving Medicine Forward

Continued success in the legislative arena takes constant vigilance. Click here to see our 2017 Legislative Agenda.

If no one was on call… Alabama wouldn’t be the 20th state to enact Direct Primary Care legislation. DPC puts patients and their doctors back in control of patients’ health and helps the uninsured, the underinsured and those with high-deductible health plans. SB 94 was sponsored by Sen. Arthur Orr (R-Decatur) and Rep. Nathaniel Ledbetter (R-Rainsville) and awaits the Governor’s signature.

If no one was on call… the Board of Medical Scholarship Awards could have seen its funding slashed but instead, the program retained its funding level of $1.4 million for 2018. The BMSA grants medical school loans to medical students and accepts as payment for the loan that student’s locating to a rural area to practice medicine. The BMSA is a critical tool for recruiting medical students to commit to practice in rural areas. As well, the economic footprint of every physician is at least $1 million, which improves both community health and local economies.

If no one was on call… Medicaid cuts could have been severe, possibly reducing access for patients within an already fragile system in which less than 20 percent of Alabama physicians participate. Due to work done during the 2016 second special session and the 2017 session, sufficient funds were made available for Medicaid without any scheduled cuts to physicians for 2018. Increasing Medicaid reimbursements to Medicare levels — a continuing priority of the Medical Association — could further increase access to care for Medicaid patients.

Beating Back the Lawsuit Industry

Personal injury lawyers are constantly seeking new opportunities to sue doctors. While Alabama’s medical liability laws have fostered fairness in the courtroom and improved the legal climate, each year personal injury attorneys seek to undo parts of the very law that helps keep “jackpot justice” and frivolous suits in check.

If no one was on call… an $80 million tax increase on physicians to fund a new government-administered malpractice claims payout system called the Patients Compensation System could have passed. The PCS would administer damage claims for physical injury and death of patients allegedly sustained at the hands of physicians. Complaints against individual physicians would begin with a call to a state-run 1-800 line and would go before panels composed of trial lawyers, citizens and physicians to determine an outcome. In addition, any determinations of fault would be reported to the National Practitioner Databank. The Patient Compensation System would undo decades of medical tort reforms which the Medical Association championed and is forced to defend from plaintiff lawyer attacks each session. The PCS deprives both patients and doctors of their legal rights.

If no one was on call… physicians could have been exposed to triple-damage lawsuits for honest Medicaid billing mistakes. The legislation would create new causes of civil action in state court for Medicaid “false claims.” The legislation would incentivize personal injury lawyers to seek out “whistleblowers” in medical clinics, hospitals and the like to pursue civil actions against physicians and others for alleged Medicaid fraud, with damages being tripled the actual loss to Medicaid. The standard in the bill would have allowed even honest billing mistakes to qualify as “Medicaid fraud,” creating new opportunities for lawsuits where honest mistakes could be penalized.

If no one was on call… physicians would have been held liable for the actions or inactions of midwives attending home births. While a lay midwife bill did pass this session establishing a State Board of Midwifery, the bill contains liability protections for physicians and also prohibitions on non-nurse midwives’ scope of practice, the types of pregnancies they may attend and a requirement for midwives to report outcomes.

If no one was on call… the right to trial by jury, including jury selection and jury size, could have been manipulated in personal injury lawyers’ favor.

If no one was on call… physicians could have been held legally responsible for others’ mistakes, including home caregivers, medical device manufacturers and for individuals following or failing to follow DNR orders.

Protecting Public Health and Access to Quality Care

Every session, various pieces of legislation aimed at improving the health of Alabamians are proposed. At the same time however, many bills are also introduced that endanger public health and safety, like those where the legislature attempts to set standards for medical care, which force physicians and their staffs to adhere to non-medically established criteria, wasting health care dollars, wasting patients’ and physicians’ time and exposing physicians to new liability concerns.

If no one was on call… legislation could have passed to lower biologic pharmaceutical standards in state law below those set by the FDA, withhold critical health information from patients and their doctors and significantly increase administrative burdens on physicians. ICYMI, read our joint letter to the Alabama Legislature opposing the bill.

If no one was on call… allergists and other physicians who compound medications within their offices could have been shut down, limiting access to critical care for patients.

If no one was on call… numerous scope of practice expansions that endanger public health could have become law, including removing all physician oversight of clinical nurse specialists; lay midwives seeking allowance of their attending home births without restriction or regulation; podiatrists seeking to amputate, do surgery and administer anesthesia up the distal third of the tibia; and marriage and family therapists seeking to be allowed to diagnose and treat mental disorders as well as removing the prohibition on their prescribing drugs.

If no one was on call… state boards and agencies with no authority over medicine could have been allowed to increase medical practice costs through additional licensing and reporting requirements.

If no one was on call… legislation dictating medical standards and guidelines for treatment of pregnant women, the elderly and terminal patients could have been placed into bills covering various topics.

Other Bills of Interest

Rural physician tax credits… legislation to increase rural physician tax credits and thereby increase access to care for rural Alabamians did not pass but will be reintroduced next session.

Infectious Disease Elimination… legislation to establish infectious disease elimination pilot programs to mitigate the spread of certain diseases failed to garner support on the last legislative day.

Constitutional amendment proclaiming the State of Alabama’s stance on the rights of unborn children… legislation passed to allow the people of Alabama to vote at the November 2018 General Election whether to add an amendment to the state constitution to:

“Declare and affirm that it is the public policy of this state to recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, most importantly the right to life in all manners and measures appropriate and lawful…”

If ratified by the people in November 2018, this Amendment could have implications for women’s health physicians.

Coverage of autism spectrum disorder therapies… legislation passed to require health plans to cover ASD therapies, with some restrictions.

Portable DNR for minors… legislation establishing a portable DNR for minors to allow minors with terminal diseases to attend school activities failed to garner enough votes to pass on the last legislative day.

If the Medical Association was not on call at the Alabama Legislature, countless bills expanding doctors’ liability, increasing physician taxes, and setting standards of care into law could have passed. At the same time, positive strides in public health — like passage of the direct primary care legislation — would not have occurred. The Medical Association is Alabama physicians’ greatest resource in advocating for the practice of medicine and the patients they serve.

Click here for a downloadable version of our 2017 Legislative Recap.

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Physician Groups Issue Joint Statement on Medicaid Funding Cuts

Physician Groups Issue Joint Statement on Medicaid Funding Cuts

April 8, 2016 | MONTGOMERY – Without Fully Funding Medicaid, Patient Care at Risk

With the passing of the General Fund budget, lawmakers appropriated $700 million for Medicaid next year, $85 million short of what is needed to fully fund Medicaid. Now the Medicaid Agency is left with the tough decisions of which programs to cut, and how deep to reach into the pockets of Alabama’s citizens who can already barely afford their medications and health treatments. Services at risk of being cut are prescription drug coverage for adults, eyeglasses for adults, outpatient dialysis, prosthetics and orthotics, hearing programs, Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), among other programs and services that patients across Alabama need to survive.

Medicaid is a critical component of our health care system, covering the young and elderly. More than half the births in Alabama and 47 percent of our children are covered by Medicaid, as well as 60 percent of Alabama’s nursing home residents. Without full funding, the Medicaid program will collapse, leaving these individuals without coverage. While uncompensated care is delivered every day in all 67 counties of this state, without Medicaid, charity care needs could skyrocket, crippling the health care delivery system and potentially placing the burden on those with private health insurance through higher premiums and co-pays.

Alabama Medicaid is the backbone of our state, supporting the health and welfare of the young and elderly citizens that physicians have pledged to protect during their medical careers. Consequently, we cannot support any solution other than fully funding a program that touches so many lives. Allowing Alabama Medicaid to continue with adequate funding is a smart investment in Alabama and her citizens. The current appropriated budget will have dire consequences.

Physician practices, hospitals and nursing homes are among the economic engines driving many Alabama communities. Closure of these health care providers will have a devastating impact on the state of Alabama and the health and prosperity of its citizens. The ripple effect will be felt from Mobile to Huntsville.

Therefore we call on the legislature and the Governor to work toward a permanent revenue solution to fully fund Medicaid.

Our organizations strongly believe that Medicaid matters … to all Alabamians.

For more information or comment, please contact:

Mark Jackson, Medical Association of the State of Alabama, (334) 954-2500
Linda Lee, Alabama Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics, (334) 954-2543
Jeff Arrington, Alabama Academy of Family Physicians, (334) 954-2570

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Official Statement on the Medicaid Funding Crisis

Official Statement on the Medicaid Funding Crisis

May 5, 2016 – Alabama’s physicians are urging our state lawmakers and Gov. Bentley to start now to find a permanent revenue solution to fully fund Alabama Medicaid before the next fiscal year.

“Alabama already runs the most bare-bones Medicaid program in the country,” said Medical Association Executive Director Mark Jackson, “so to end this legislative session without an appropriate funding solution is more than heartbreaking. It’s dangerous. In just five months, one-quarter of our state’s population will be at risk of losing their access to health care because of the legislature’s inability to come to an agreement on funding options that would have helped close the $85 million gap in Medicaid’s budget. More than half the births in Alabama and 47 percent of our children are covered by Medicaid, as well as 60 percent of Alabama’s nursing home residents. Without full funding, the Medicaid program will collapse, leaving these individuals without coverage. We are asking Gov. Bentley and our legislators begin work today to find a permanent funding plan to secure Medicaid and reassure our residents that the medical care they need will remain within their grasp. The Medical Association remains ready to work with our elected officials to find a permanent solution to the Medicaid funding crisis.”

The Medical Association believes Alabama Medicaid is more than an insurance program for the poor and underinsured and must be fully funded as it is critical to the health care infrastructure of our state. Alabama Medicaid provides health coverage for eligible children, pregnant women, and severely disabled and impoverished adults – about 1 million Alabamians.

Alabama’s physicians strongly believe that Medicaid matters … to all Alabamians.

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Physician Groups Issue Joint Statement on 2016 Special Session Announcement

Physician Groups Issue Joint Statement on 2016 Special Session Announcement

July 27, 2016 | MONTGOMERY – Our organizations applaud the Governor and are encouraged that he has taken the first step toward fully funding Alabama Medicaid by announcing his intention to call a special session.

As for his proposal for a lottery, we support the passage of new revenue that will provide for a long-term fix for Medicaid. As with any legislation, we will need to see the details of what he is proposing to ensure that it does in fact fully fund Medicaid’s needs for the long term before we can take a formal position.

In addition to the need for long-term funding, there is also a critical need to fix the $85 million shortfall in the 2017 budget, which the lottery will not do because of the time necessary for implementation. Consequently, it is important that the Governor and lawmakers find both a solution for 2017 and a long-term a revenue stream for Alabama Medicaid. We are concerned that the Governor did not address a short-term funding solution in his announcement today.

Alabama Medicaid is the backbone of our state, supporting the health and welfare of the young and elderly citizens that physicians have pledged to protect during their medical careers. Consequently, we cannot support any solution other than fully funding a program that touches so many lives. Allowing Alabama Medicaid to continue with adequate funding is a smart investment in Alabama and her citizens.

Physician practices, hospitals and nursing homes are among the economic engines driving many Alabama communities. Closure of these health care providers will have a devastating impact on the state of Alabama and the health and prosperity of its citizens. The ripple effect will be felt from Mobile to Huntsville.

Our organizations strongly believe that Medicaid matters … to all Alabamians.

For more information or comment, please contact:

Mark Jackson, Medical Association of the State of Alabama, (334) 954-2500
Linda Lee, Alabama Chapter-American Academy of Pediatrics, (334) 954-2543
Jeff Arrington, Alabama Academy of Family Physicians, (334) 954-2570

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Official Statement on Special Session/Medicaid Funding

Official Statement on Special Session/Medicaid Funding

Sept. 7, 2016 – The Medical Association of the State of Alabama would like to thank the members of the Alabama House of Representatives and Senate who supported the passage of the BP legislation today, which will provide much needed additional funding for Alabama Medicaid. We are pleased that our lawmakers have worked together for a solution for FY 2017 as well as providing additional funds for FY 2018. We are hopeful this additional funding will allow physician practices that were forced to lay off individuals to resume normal operations and continue to provide access to care to their Medicaid patients.

“Alabama already runs the most bare-bones Medicaid program in the country,” said Medical Association of the State of Alabama Executive Director Mark Jackson. “Without this additional funding, the cuts that Medicaid had implemented beginning Aug. 1, would have been dangerous to the infrastructure our state’s health care system. This additional funding will provide some stability to the system which covers more than half the births in Alabama, 47 percent of our children, and 60 percent of our nursing home residents.”

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