Posts Tagged alapac

Three Simple Steps for Increasing Medicine’s Influence

Three Simple Steps for Increasing Medicine’s Influence

From the outside looking in, the political process likely seems as inviting as a shark tank, as navigable as a corn maze, as predictable as the Kentucky Derby. Intimidating, confusing and frustrating are often used by citizens to describe advocacy-related interactions with government and frankly, this isn’t surprising given most citizens’ level of understanding of the political process.

In his Gettysburg Address, President Abraham Lincoln famously opined our nation’s form of government – “of the people, by the people, for the people” – would long endure. Unlike the direct democracy of 5th century Athens, Americans live in a representative democracy, electing individuals from city councilmen to the President to make decisions for them.

Representative democracy eliminates the need for the citizenry to be involved in the minutiae of modern governance. The downside, however, can be a culture of complacency on the part of the electorate. Outcomes are typically directed by those choosing to engage government on issues important to them, and so government becomes “of the people, by the people, for the people [who choose to participate].” The citizenry is ultimately still responsible for holding government accountable, through either direct engagement with lawmakers or the electoral process (or both), though few understand how to do so.

By following the three simple steps below, physicians can increase their influence on issues important to them and the patients they serve.

Step 1: Join, join, join

A significant portion of success is simply showing up, but most physicians don’t have the time to spend flying back and forth to Washington or driving to Montgomery for Congressional or legislative meetings, hearings and sessions. Laws and or regulations are constantly under consideration in either the nation’s or state’s capitol directly affecting medical care. A practicing physician can’t possibly make all the scheduled meetings and still see patients, much less attend to the very necessary continual monitoring of legislative and regulatory bodies that is required of successful modern-day advocacy operations.

But when like-minded people pool their resources good things can happen. Advocacy organizations concerned with ensuring delivery of quality care and a positive practice and liability environment – from individual state and national specialty societies to the Medical Association of the State of Alabama – all deserve your support and membership.

They are all working for you and joining them gives these organizations the resources to hire qualified personnel to represent physicians and their patients before legislative and regulatory bodies.

Step 2: Get to know a few key people

Physicians are responsible for a lot, and in today’s world especially, it’s easy to get in a routine and leave the job of representing the profession to someone else. After all, isn’t that what membership dues are for? Yes and no. While membership in organizations advocating for physicians helps fund advocacy operations, paying membership dues alone is not enough, not in the era of social media, 24-hour news and increased engagement by those on the other side of issues from organized medicine.

Perhaps surprisingly, getting to know a few key people is not difficult, even if only by phone or email. While those paid to represent physicians will know the members of the Legislature and Congress and try to convince them of medicine’s position, in lawmakers’ minds, there is no contact more important than one from a constituent.

Physicians should start locally, getting to know their State Representative and State Senator first, gradually working up to establishing relationships with their member of Congress and U.S. Senators. If they are doing their job well as an elected representative, these legislators and their staff will be glad to hear from a constituent and get his/her perspective. At the same time, don’t overlook the importance of encouraging fellow physicians to engage their local elected officials in meaningful dialogue as well so overall efforts will be amplified.

For more information on how to interact and communicate with lawmakers, check out the Medical Association’s ABCs of VIP.

Step 3: Put your money where your mouth is

Medical and specialty society membership dollars cannot be legally used for elections purposes, and so separate political action committees or PACs must be established and funds raised each year to help elect candidates physicians can work with on important issues. Not surprisingly, numerous entities whose objectives are at odds with medical liability reform, meaningful health system reform and with ensuring the highest standards for medical care are eager to get their allies elected to office.

Just like their parent organizations, the PACs of specialty societies and the official political committee of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama (ALAPAC) are all worthy of your support. When it comes to PAC contributions, never underestimate the impact of even a small donation.

Choosing not to participate in the political process – when it’s known the decisions of lawmakers directly affect medicine – is akin to getting sued, consciously sitting out voir dire and letting the plaintiff’s lawyer pick the jury.

Summary

The future of medical care, in Alabama and the nation, rests not with elected lawmakers and appointed bureaucrats but with the men and women actually caring for patients every day. A representative democracy functions best when the electorate holds those elected to office accountable. Increasing medicine’s ability to successfully advocate for physicians and the patients they serve will require increased participation in the political process. It is incumbent upon physicians to join the organizations fighting for them, to get to know their elected officials and to contribute to PACs whose goals align with their own.

By Niko Corley
Director, Legislative Affairs
Deputy Director, Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC)

Posted in: Advocacy

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Nearly All ALAPAC-Supported Candidates Won Their Elections

Nearly All ALAPAC-Supported Candidates Won Their Elections

Tuesday’s election nationally saw the U.S. House flip from Republican to Democrat-controlled, but U.S. Senate Republicans actually increased their majority. In Alabama, Republicans remain in control of both house of the legislature and all statewide elected offices.

From an election results standpoint within Alabama, the Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC) participated in 111 out of 140 state legislative races. 99 percent of ALAPAC-supported legislative candidates won their election bids Tuesday. Regarding statewide offices, the success rate for ALAPAC-supported candidates was 100 percent. Later today, ALAPAC contributors will receive a much more detailed breakdown by email of Tuesday’s election results, an analysis of voting trends and forecasts for what Alabama physicians may expect the next several years.

The ALAPAC Board is incredibly appreciative of the resources Alabama physicians have contributed toward ALAPAC’s election efforts. As the official political committee of Alabama physicians and the Medical Association, ALAPAC exists to elect men and women whom physicians can work with on issues affecting patients and the practice of medicine. If you would like to contribute to ALAPAC, please click here.

Contributions to ALAPAC are not tax deductible as charitable contributions for Federal income tax purposes. Voluntary political contributions to Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC) are not limited to the suggested amount. The Medical Association will not favor or disadvantage anyone based upon the amount or failure to contribute. A portion of the contributions may be used in connection with Federal elections. Corporate funds will be used in either state elections or for education purposes. Federal contributions are subject to the limitations of FEC Regulations 110.1, .2, and .5.

Posted in: Advocacy

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Three Simple Steps for Increasing Medicine’s Influence

Three Simple Steps for Increasing Medicine’s Influence

From the outside looking in, the political process likely seems as inviting as a shark tank, as navigable as a corn maze, as predictable as the Kentucky Derby. Intimidating, confusing and frustrating are often used by citizens to describe advocacy-related interactions with government and frankly, this isn’t surprising given most citizens’ level of understanding of the political process.

In his Gettysburg Address, President Abraham Lincoln famously opined our nation’s form of government — “of the people, by the people, for the people” — would long endure. Unlike the direct democracy of 5th century Athens, Americans live in a representative democracy, electing individuals from city councilmen to the President to make decisions for them.

Representative democracy eliminates the need for the citizenry to be involved in the minutiae of modern governance. The downside, however, can be a culture of complacency on the part of the electorate. Outcomes are typically directed by those choosing to engage government on issues important to them, and so government becomes “of the people, by the people, for the people [who choose to participate].” The citizenry is ultimately still responsible for holding government accountable, through either direct engagement with lawmakers or the electoral process (or both), though few understand how to do so.

By following the three simple steps below, physicians can increase their influence on issues important to them and the patients they serve.

Step 1: Join, join, join.

A significant portion of success is simply showing up, but most physicians don’t have the time to spend flying back and forth to Washington or driving to Montgomery for Congressional or legislative meetings, hearings and sessions. Laws and or regulations are constantly under consideration in either the nation’s or state’s capitol directly affecting medical care. A practicing physician can’t possibly make all the scheduled meetings and still see patients, much less attend to the necessary continual monitoring of legislative and regulatory bodies required of successful modern-day advocacy operations.

But when like-minded people pool their resources good things can happen. Advocacy organizations concerned with ensuring delivery of quality care and a positive practice and liability environment — from individual state and national specialty societies to the Medical Association of the State of Alabama — all deserve your support and membership.

They are all working for you and joining them gives these organizations the resources to hire qualified personnel to represent physicians and their patients before legislative and regulatory bodies.

Step 2: Get to know a few key people.

Physicians are responsible for a lot, and in today’s world especially, it’s easy to get into a routine and leave the job of representing the profession to someone else. After all, isn’t that what membership dues are for? Yes and no. While membership in organizations advocating for physicians helps fund advocacy operations, paying membership dues alone is not enough, not in the era of social media, 24-hour news and increased engagement by those on the other side of issues from organized medicine.

Perhaps surprisingly, getting to know a few key people is not difficult, even if only by phone or email. While those paid to represent physicians will know the members of the Legislature and Congress and try to convince them of medicine’s position, in lawmakers’ minds, there is no contact more important than one from a constituent.

Physicians should start locally, getting to know their State Representative and State Senator first, gradually working up to establishing relationships with their member of Congress and U.S. Senators. If they are doing their job well as an elected representative, these legislators and their staff will be glad to hear from a constituent and get his/her perspective. At the same time, don’t overlook the importance of encouraging fellow physicians to engage their local elected officials in meaningful dialogue as well so overall efforts will be amplified.

For more information on how to interact and communicate with lawmakers, check out the Medical Association’s ABCs of VIP.

Step 3: Put your money where your mouth is.

Medical and specialty society membership dollars cannot be legally used for elections purposes, and so separate political action committees or PACs must be established and funds raised each year to help elect candidates physicians can work with on important issues. Not surprisingly, numerous entities whose objectives are at odds with medical liability reform, meaningful health system reform and with ensuring the highest standards for medical care are eager to get their allies elected to office.

Just like their parent organizations, the PACs of specialty societies and the official political committee of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama (ALAPAC) are all worthy of your support. When it comes to PAC contributions, never underestimate the impact of even a small donation.

Choosing not to participate in the political process — when it’s known the decisions of lawmakers directly affect medicine — is akin to getting sued, consciously sitting out voir dire and letting the plaintiff’s lawyer pick the jury.

Summary

The future of medical care, in Alabama and the nation, rests not with elected lawmakers and appointed bureaucrats but with the men and women actually caring for patients every day. A representative democracy functions best when the electorate holds those elected to office accountable. Increasing medicine’s ability to successfully advocate for physicians and the patients they serve will require increased participation in the political process. It is incumbent upon physicians to join the organizations fighting for them, to get to know their elected officials and to contribute to PACs whose goals align with their own.

By Niko Corley
Director, Legislative Affairs
Deputy Director, Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC)

Posted in: Advocacy

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What Have You Done for Me Lately?

What Have You Done for Me Lately?

“What have the Medical Association and ALAPAC done for me lately?”

It’s a question posed to me often, in various forms, by physicians whom I’m asking to join the Medical Association and contribute to ALAPAC. It’s a tough one to reply to – not for a shortage of answers – but for the difficulty, even for a seasoned communicator like myself, to encapsulate succinctly.

I like analogies, so here’s one to start: a legislative session is like a surgical procedure; hundreds of things can go wrong, and getting through one without incident is deemed a success. To reiterate: when nothing bad happens in a legislative session that is a victory. Preposterous? Allow me to elaborate.

It’s been attributed to everyone from Thomas Jefferson to Mark Twain, but the old adage “no one’s life, liberty or property are safe while the legislature is in session” certainly rings true. The Alabama Legislature may only be in session three days each week for three-and-a-half months (plus special sessions) a year, but just like with a surgical procedure, countless things can go wrong during that time.

Representing physicians at the legislature, the Medical Association is severely outnumbered. There are nearly 600 registered lobbyists in Alabama, many with clients – drug companies, health insurers, personal injury lawyers – interested in health care but whose corporate profits strategy or legislative goals are at odds with those of patients and physicians. I’ve heard physicians say they don’t like politics, that it’s dirty business. This is understandable but frankly, irrelevant. Feelings have no place here. Like it or not, politicians are in your business.

On average, a typical legislative session will see a combined 1,000 House and Senate bills introduced, with roughly 15 percent touching health care in some fashion. Over a four-year legislative cycle, that’s 600 “procedures” to get through with as few complications as possible. Some of these are initiatives the Medical Association supports, others will need tweaking through amendments or substitutes, still others will have no redeeming elements whatsoever and are outright opposed.

If that sounds simple in principle, it is not so in practice. To illustrate the complexity and unpredictability of an average legislative day, picture an emergency physician. At the State House, there is little warning of what daily catastrophes will present themselves or what will have to be triaged depending on severity. Committee testimony, one-on-one meetings with legislators, bill negotiations with opposing parties, these are all part of a typical legislative day. Getting through the day without any bad happenings is a success, even more so all 30 days of the session.

While it is the Medical Association’s role to lobby the legislature on issues important to physicians, it is the role of the Alabama Medical PAC (ALAPAC) to help elect candidates to office with whom physicians and the Medical Association can work on important health-related issues. Over just the past few legislative sessions alone, the Medical Association, with the help of ALAPAC-supported legislators, successfully saw passage of several important bills.

These include “virtual credit card” legislation to help medical practices from unknowingly getting hit with hidden processing fees in electronic payments from health insurers and RCOs; the chemical endangerment “fix” legislation protecting pregnant women and their doctors from prosecution for the issuance of legitimate prescriptions (after the courts issued a new interpretation of Alabama’s chemical endangerment of children law); and, direct primary care legislation, which ensures state government stays out of private contracts between physicians and their patients. The list also includes legislation related to increasing naloxone availability, establishing guidelines for interstate medical licensure, and preventing Medicaid cuts, to name but a few.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, other proposed legislation is so bad there is no “fixing” it, bills like the Patient Compensation System legislation from 2016. The PCS legislation would levy an $80 million tax increase on physicians to fund a new government-administered malpractice claims payout system that would deprive physicians and legitimately-injured patients of their legal rights, undo decades of medical liability reforms and make Alabama doctors appear – on the national claims database – to be practicing sub-standard medicine. This legislation was, with the assistance of ALAPAC-supported legislators, defeated.

In the same vein as the PCS bill, pharmaceutical legislation was introduced in 2017 that would (1) lower biologic pharmaceutical standards in Alabama law below those set by the FDA, (2) withhold critical health information from patients and their doctors and, (3) significantly increase administrative burdens on physicians. This legislation met the same fate as the PCS legislation, but both bills are expected to return in a future session. (Click here for a complete recap of the 2017 legislative session.)

Clearly, the Medical Association and ALAPAC have been hard at work for physicians and patients, from the primary care doctor to the sub-specialist. There is a natural tendency for physicians to associate and support their respective specialties, which they unequivocally should. At the same time however, the collective strength of a unified state medical society representing all physicians of all specialties and the patients they care for is much greater than any individual specialty on its own.

This article began with a question and so it is fitting to end with one: What have you done lately to help the Medical Association and ALAPAC succeed for you?

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