Posts Tagged addiction

Attention Primary Care Providers: Alcohol and Drug Conference is March 19-21

Attention Primary Care Providers: Alcohol and Drug Conference is March 19-21

 

See also: Are You Interested in Becoming a DATA-Waived Physician?

Alabama Department of Mental Health has partnered with the Alabama Department of Public Health on a grant to increase awareness of substance use disorders among primary care professionals. This grant will allow ADMH to pay the registration fee only for any of the following to attend the Alabama School of Alcohol and Other Drug Studies (ASADS):

  • MD
  • DO
  • PA
  • CRNP
  • CNM
  • RN

The Medical Foundation of Alabama designates this live activity for a maximum of 27 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.

ASADS has been conducting conferences for over 43 years. Over the past couple of years, there has been a heavy emphasis in the community and at the state level to begin to develop a system of care that integrates primary care and substance abuse treatment. There are many great speakers at this year’s conference.

Dr. Alta DeRoo, M.D., FACOG, will present Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) Waiver Training. This is required 8-hour training.

T4: Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) Waiver Training

This course is designed for MDs, DOs, PAs and CRNPs who are interested in becoming a 2000 Data Waived physician. This class will be held from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. to meet the 8-hour requirement.

Course Description:

This presentation is designed to train qualified physicians in dispensing or prescribing specifically approved Schedule III, IV and V narcotic medications for the treatment of opioid addiction in an office-based setting. The goal of this training is to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to provide optimal care to opioid use disorder patients by providing:

1) an overview of opioid use disorder,

2) the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine,

3) process of patient selection,

4) clinical use of buprenorphine,

5) nonpharmacological interventions,

6) medical psychiatric conditions in opioid use disorder patients, office procedures, and

7) special treatment population.

This eight-hour training, which will include eight separate modules and four case studies. Each of the speakers will be presenting for two hours. The remaining two hours are broken up over the four case studies. Designated by the DHHS, this training meets the eight-hour requirement and is designed for physicians to dispense buprenorphine in office practice for treatment of opioid use disorder. Participation in this training will provide physicians with a comprehensive overview of buprenorphine prescribing and its safe and effective use in an office-based setting. This training is designed for physicians and other primary care providers who are likely to treat opioid-dependent persons in their practice, such as those in family practice, general internal medicine, psychiatry, pediatrics, adolescent medicine specialists, and Opioid Treatment Programs.

Course Objectives:

After attending the course, a participant will be able to:

• review addiction treatment in office-based practices;

• discuss the pharmacological treatments of opioid use disorder;

• determine what medical record documentation must be followed;

• discuss the process of buprenorphine induction as well as stabilization and maintenance techniques;

• describe how to take a patient history and evaluation; and

• review safety concerns and drug interactions.

Dr. Merrill Norton, Ph.D., will be conducting a three-part series on The Pain of Pleasure: A Pharmacist’s Guide to Opioid Use Disorders for Prescribers and Other Healthcare Professionals.

Dr. Cardwell Nuckols, Ph.D.The Neurobiology of Addiction: The Addiction Process in Three Stages

Dr. Boyett, D.M.D., D.O., DFASAM, and Dr. Taylor, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.S.A.MThe Delivery of Office-Based Addiction Treatment (OBOT) in the 21st Century

ADMH can pay the registration fee only. To have your registration fee paid, complete the registration form and return it to Kathy House at kathy.house@mh.alabama.gov no later than Feb. 24.

REGISTRATION FORM           BROCHURE

See also: Are You Interested in Becoming a DATA-Waived Physician?

Posted in: Education

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Overshadowed by Opioids, Meth is Back and Hospitalizations Surge

Overshadowed by Opioids, Meth is Back and Hospitalizations Surge

The number of people hospitalized because of amphetamine use is skyrocketing in the United States, but the resurgence of the drug largely has been overshadowed by the nation’s intense focus on opioids.

Amphetamine-related hospitalizations jumped by about 245 percent from 2008 to 2015, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That dwarfs the rise in hospitalizations from other drugs, such as opioids, which were up by about 46 percent. The most significant increases were in Western states.

The surge in hospitalizations and deaths due to amphetamines “is just totally off the radar,” said Jane Maxwell, an addiction researcher. “Nobody is paying attention.”

Doctors see evidence of the drug’s comeback in emergency departments, where patients arrive agitated, paranoid and aggressive. Paramedics and police officers see it on the streets, where suspects’ heart rates are so high that they need to be taken to the hospital for medical clearance before being booked into jail. And medical examiners see it in the morgue, where in a few states, such as Texas and Colorado, overdoses from meth have surpassed those from the opioid heroin.

Amphetamines are stimulant drugs, which are both legally prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and produced illegally into methamphetamine. Most of the hospitalizations in the study are believed to be due to methamphetamine use.

Commonly known as crystal meth, methamphetamine was popular in the 1990s before laws made it more difficult to access the pseudoephedrine, a common cold medicine, needed to produce it. In recent years, law enforcement officials said, there are fewer domestic meth labs and more meth is smuggled in from south of the border.

As opioids become harder to get, police said, more people have turned to meth, which is inexpensive and readily available.

Lupita Ruiz, 25, started using methamphetamine in her late teens but said she has been clean for about two years. When she was using, she said, her heart beat fast, she would stay up all night and she would forget to eat.

Ruiz, who lives in Spokane, Wash., said she was taken to the hospital twice after having mental breakdowns related to methamphetamine use, including a monthlong stay in the psychiatric ward in 2016. One time, Ruiz said, she yelled at and kicked police officers after they responded to a call to her apartment. Another time, she started walking on the freeway but doesn’t remember why.

“It just made me go crazy,” she said. “I was all messed up in my head.”

The federal government estimates that more than 10,000 people died of meth-related drug overdoses last year. Deaths from meth overdose generally result from multiple organ failure or heart attacks and strokes, caused by extraordinary pulse rates and skyrocketing blood pressure.

In California, the number of amphetamine-related overdose deaths rose by 127 percent from 456 in 2008 to 1,036 in 2013. At the same time, the number of opioid-related overdose deaths rose by 8.4 percent from 1,784 to 1,934, according to the most recent data from the state Department of Public Health.

“It taxes your first responders, your emergency rooms, your coroners,” said Robert Pennal, a retired supervisor with the California Department of Justice. “It’s an incredible burden on the health system.”

Costs also are rising. The JAMA study, based on hospital discharge data, found that the cost of amphetamine-related hospitalizations had jumped from $436 million in 2003 to nearly $2.2 billion by 2015. Medicaid was the primary payer.

“There is not a day that goes by that I don’t see someone acutely intoxicated on methamphetamine,” said Dr. Tarak Trivedi, an emergency room physician in Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties. “It’s a huge problem, and it is 100 percent spilling over into the emergency room.”

Trivedi said many psychiatric patients are also meth users. Some act so dangerously that they require sedation or restraints. He also sees people who have been using the drug for a long time and are dealing with the downstream consequences.

In the short term, the drug can cause a rapid heart rate and dangerously high blood pressure. In the long term, it can cause anxiety, dental problems and weight loss.

“You see people as young as their 30s with congestive heart failure as if they were in their 70s,” he said.

Jon Lopey, the sheriff-coroner of Siskiyou County in rural Northern California, said his officers frequently encounter meth users who are prone to violence and in the midst of what appear to be psychotic episodes. Many are emaciated and have missing teeth, dilated pupils and a tendency to pick at their skin because of a sensation of something beneath it.

“Meth is very, very destructive,” said Lopey, who also sits on the executive board of the California Peace Officers Association. “It is just so debilitating the way it ruins lives and health.”

Nationwide, amphetamine-related hospitalizations were primarily due to mental health or cardiovascular complications of the drug use, the JAMA study found. About half of the amphetamine hospitalizations also involved at least one other drug.

Because there has been so much attention on opioids, “we have not been properly keeping tabs on other substance use trends as robustly as we should,” said study author Dr. Tyler Winkelman, a physician at Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis.

Sometimes doctors have trouble distinguishing symptoms of methamphetamine intoxication and underlying mental health conditions, said Dr. Erik Anderson, an emergency room physician at Highland Hospital in Oakland, Calif. Patients also may be homeless and using other drugs alongside the methamphetamine.

Unlike opioid addiction, meth addiction cannot be treated with medication. Rather, people addicted to the drug rely on counseling through outpatient and residential treatment centers.

The opioid epidemic, which resulted in about 49,000 overdose deaths last year, recently prompted bipartisan federal legislation to improve access to recovery, expand coverage to treatment and combat drugs coming across the border.

There hasn’t been a similar recent legislative focus on methamphetamine or other drugs. And there simply aren’t enough resources devoted to amphetamine addiction to reduce the hospitalizations and deaths, said Maxwell, a researcher at the Addiction Research Institute at the University of Texas at Austin. The number of residential treatment facilities, for example, has continued to decline, she said.

“We have really undercut treatment for methamphetamine,” Maxwell said. “Meth has been completely overshadowed by opioids.”

Kaiser Health News coverage in California is supported in part by Blue Shield of California Foundation.

Posted in: Opioid

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U.S. House Passes SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act

U.S. House Passes SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act

In a 396-14 vote, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment (SUPPORT) for Patients and Communities Act, or H.R. 6 —bipartisan opioid legislation that aims to curb drug abuse.

Sponsored by Greg Walden, R-Oregon, the package of legislation contains more than 50 individually approved bills to address what Pres. Donald Trump has called a health emergency.

The SUPPORT bill is intended to fight the opioid crisis by advancing treatment and recovery programs, improving prevention efforts, providing resources to communities and fighting drugs like Fentanyl. The legislation also calls for a review of current opioid prescriptions, development and usage of non-addictive painkillers, making a patient’s addiction history as part of their medical records to prevent relapse and reducing the trafficking of Chinese fentanyl into the country. Additionally, the legislation will expand Medicare and Medicaid-related services to combat drug abuse.

Opposition votes came from 13 Republicans and a lone Democrat. Alabama’s Rep. Mo Brooks voted against the legislation, which is now headed to the Senate for review and passage.

In short, the bill makes several changes to state Medicaid programs to address opioid and substance use disorders. Specifically, the bill:

  • modifies provisions related to coverage for juvenile inmates and former foster care youth,
  • establishes a demonstration project to increase provider treatment capacity for substance use disorders,
  • requires the establishment of drug management programs for at-risk beneficiaries,
  • establishes drug review and utilization requirements,
  • extends the enhanced federal matching rate for expenditures regarding substance use disorder health home services, and
  • temporarily requires coverage of medication-assisted treatment.

The bill also alters Medicare requirements to address opioid use. Specifically, the bill:

  • exempts substance use disorder telehealth services from specified requirements,
  • requires the initial examination for new enrollees to include an opioid use disorder screening,
  • modifies provisions regarding electronic prescriptions and post-surgical pain management,
  • requires prescription drug plan sponsors to establish drug management programs for at-risk beneficiaries, and
  • requires coverage for services provided by certified opioid treatment programs.

The bill also addresses other opioid-related issues. Specifically, the bill:

  • establishes and expands programs to support increased detection and monitoring of fentanyl and other synthetic opioids, and
  • increases the maximum number of patients that health care practitioners may initially treat with medication-assisted treatment (i.e., under a buprenorphine waiver).

Additionally, the bill temporarily eliminates the enhanced federal matching rate for Medicaid expenditures regarding specified medical services provided by certain managed care organizations.

The Medical Association is closely monitoring the status of this legislation, but we encourage you to read more about the legislation here.

Posted in: Advocacy

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